Academics

Course Descriptions

 

 

  • Business
  • English
  • Fine Arts
  • Foreign Language
  • Mathematics
  • Physical Education
  • Science
  • Social Studies
  • Religious Studies

 

 

Business Department

Department Head: Mrs. Leslie Bergeron

 

Department Goals

Business department courses are designed to provide the foundation for computer technology in the workplace. The goal is to equip students with "life-skills" that are vital in today’s global society, for both career and personal use. Students will understand the career preparation and job acquisition skills required for employment, professional growth, and employment transition in the field of business. Students will match skills and aptitudes to business occupations, exploring business career options, and applying job acquisition skills. Students will understand communications as applied to business situations. They will demonstrate competency by selecting and using appropriate forms of business communications while working individually and in groups. Students will understand technology used in business. They will demonstrate competency by utilizing technology to access, manipulate, and produce information. Students will understand information processing concepts necessary to gather, create, and analyze data and to function in a rapidly changing technological, global society.

 

COURSE OFFERINGS

 

INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS COMPUTER APPLICATIONS

Students will learn to produce documents using a variety of software applications-- word processing, database, spreadsheet, and desktop publishing. Students will also learn to select the appropriate technology to address business and personal needs. They will also examine and use communications software including internet technology for personal and business tasks and focus on an introduction to designing and creating pages for the world wide web.

 

 

 

 

 

English Department

Department Head: Mrs. Vivica Marino

 

COURSE OFFERINGS

 

ENGLISH I

English I is an in-depth study of classical works in literature (i.e., Medieval legends, Shakespearean drama, Greek drama, mythology, etc.). The course comprises drama, novels, poetry, composition, vocabulary, and grammar. Composition is intertwined with literature and vocabulary. The student will develop accuracy in the areas of proper usage, exactness, proper diction, unity, and coherence. Students will concentrate their writing in areas of narration, description, and expository forms. Students will develop their writing skills from the three-point essay, using the funnel approach, to the research paper. In the process, the students will become acclimated in the use of the library and the MLA Form and Style sheet. 

 

ENGLISH I (HONORS)

English Honors I is an intensive study of literature, grammar, and composition. This course encompasses the areas of Medieval legends, Shakespearean and Greek drama, mythology, and poetry. Special emphasis is placed on supplementary reading and in-depth composition development. This course will concentrate on perfecting the student’s writing skills, as well as exposing them to more study in the areas of analytical thinking and expression. Focus will also be placed on the student’s ability to apply various literary techniques to genres relevant to this grade level. A comprehensive research paper will reflect the development of the student’s skills in the gathering and application of appropriate material. Applicants must meet honors program standards.

 

ENGLISH II

English II is an in-depth study of classical and contemporary literature including: the short story, drama, fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and the novel with emphasis on critical thinking and reading skills. Further emphasis will be placed on skills such as: grammar, mechanics, and the writing process (including paragraphs, essays, poetry, and creative writing). Consistent vocabulary development is considered to be a critical part of English II. Research skills will again be reviewed as a method of reinforcing the research process throughout the high school years. Julius Caesar is used as a base in learning the elements of the Shakespearean tragedy and prose fiction. *Prerequisite: English I

 

ENGLISH II (HONORS)

English II Honors is an in-depth study of classical and contemporary literature including: the short story, drama, fiction, nonfiction, poetry and the novel with emphasis on critical thinking and reading skills. Further emphasis will be placed on skills such as: grammar, mechanics, and the writing process (including paragraphs, essays, poetry, and creative writing). Consistent vocabulary development is considered to be a critical part of English II. Research skills will again be reviewed as a method of reinforcing the research process throughout the high school years. Julius Caesar is used as a base in learning the elements of Shakespearean tragedy and prose fiction. Creative projects involving these readings will be assigned in addition to in-depth essay assignments employing such skills as: drawing conclusions, making inferences, and critical analysis. A research project will be assigned in the fall. Applicants must meet honors program standards. *Prerequisite: English I

 

ENGLISH III

English III involves student exposure to a survey of the literature of the United States as well as in-depth investigation of selected pieces representative of that literary tradition. Students will, in conjunction with their studies of this literature, develop writing skills, particularly in the areas of comparison/contrast, explanation, and description. In addition, students will study and practice techniques of sentence structure, vocabulary development, and reading comprehension.  *Prerequisite: English II

 

ENGLISH III (HONORS)

English III Honors is an in-depth study of American Literature. The student will read on an independent basis and investigate in-depth major selections of literature for the purpose of critical and comparative analysis. Further emphasis will be placed on skills such as: grammar, mechanics, and the writing process. This course will also address research techniques and serves as a preparatory class for English IV Dual Enrollment. *Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program and completion of English II.

 

ENGLISH III (DUAL ENROLLMENT)

English III Dual Enrollment students will engage in rigorous course work that may provide freshman level college English credit through Southwest Louisiana Community College. The student will read on an independent basis and investigate in depth major selections of American literature for the purpose of critical and comparative analysis. Students will have access to the South Louisiana Community College library while researching literary topics. Extensive outside reading and several independent projects will be required. NOTE: Students in the course receive high school credit as well as college credit through Southwest Louisiana Community College. The actual credit students receive depends on the English and composite scores on the ACT. Applicants must have a minimum English score on the ACT or PLAN Test of 22 and a minimum of a 20 on the composite score for admission to the university. Tuition for the course is set by SLCC and is subject to change but will be approximately $170 per semester. *Prerequisite: English II Honors or Permission of Instructor 

 

ENGLISH IV

English IV is a course aimed at preparing the student for the tasks which shall be required in freshman level college English courses. This goal shall be attained through careful study and interpretation of a survey of British literature from its origins to contemporary times, a review of the usage and mechanics of written English, and the development of a variety of writing strategies. This course will also address research techniques and some modes of creative writing. * Prerequisite: English III

 

ENGLISH IV (DUAL ENROLLMENT)

English IV Dual Enrollment students will engage in rigorous course work that may provide freshman/sophomore level college English credit through Southwest Louisiana Community College. The student will read on an independent basis and investigate in depth major selections of British literature for the purpose of critical and comparative analysis. Students will have access to the South Louisiana Community College library while researching literary topics. Extensive outside reading and several independent projects will be required. NOTE: Students in the course receive high school credit as well as college credit through Southwest Louisiana Community College. The actual credit students receive depends on the English and composite scores on the ACT.Applicants must have a minimum English score on the ACT of 22 and a composite score of 20 for admission to the university. Tuition for the course is set by SLCC and is subject to change but will be approximately $170 per semester. *Prerequisite: English III Honors or English III Dual Enrollment or Permission of the Instructor.

 

PUBLICATIONS I: (YEARBOOK)

Publications I introduces the student to the fundamentals of journalistic procedures as they apply to yearbook production. Included are photography, writing, editing, layout and design, finance, advertising, sales, and public relations. Mastering computer programs such as Adobe Page Maker 5.0 and Yeartech will be achieved. Prerequisite: Admission into the Publications class is through teacher approval. All yearbook students will be required to sell a minimum of $700 in ads for publication in the book. A contract must be signed by the parent and student for participation in the course. 

 

PUBLICATIONS II/III: (YEARBOOK)

Publications II/III refines the skills learned in Publications I. Returning students take on leadership roles and accept greater responsibilities while furthering their knowledge of and experience with journalistic procedures. Prerequisite: Admission into the Publications class is through teacher approval. All yearbook students will be required to sell a minimum of $700 in ads for publication in the book. A contract must be signed by the parent and student for participation in the course. 

 

 

 

 

Fine Arts Department

Department Head: Mrs. Josette Surratt

 

 

COURSE OFFERINGS

 

ART I

Art I is an introduction to the basics of art techniques, processes, materials and terminology. The focus of the course will be on the elements and principles of art design. Creative expression will be emphasized through two-dimensional works of art using media such as pencil, charcoal, pastels, paint and ink. The students will be exposed to basic drawing, color theory, perspective drawing, portraits, printmaking and painting. Vocabulary and art history will be included with each unit. The cost per student for art supplies for the year is $50.00.

 

ART II/III

This course is designed to reinforce and enhance knowledge of the elements and principles of design through two and three-dimensional works of art. The student is exposed to new media, techniques, and terminology. Creative expression will be emphasized through media such as paper, photography, wire, papier-mache’, plaster, clay, fibers, wood, and metals as well as pencil, charcoal, pastels, and paint. A greater sensitivity and appreciation for art will be developed through art history and critiques. Research of artists will be required. Students will maintain a daily sketchbook and develop a portfolio. The cost per student for art supplies for the year is $50.00. Prerequisite: Art I/Art II

 

THEATRE I, THEATRE II, ADVANCED THEATRE

These courses are designed to explore the skills of public speaking. The student will advance his/her knowledge in the areas of research, organization, and delivery of a presentation. Students in the courses are expected to use this enhanced knowledge in work with the competitive speech team and school drama productions. Students will explore, present, and compete in extemporaneous speaking, debate, interpretative readings, oratory, drama, and various other forms of public speaking, as well as the production aspects of drama.Students in Theatre II or Advanced Theatre MUST participate in competitive speech. Teacher approval is required to schedule the courses. There may be expenses with competitive speech or the theatrical production. A contract must be signed by the student and parent agreeing to the performance requirements of the class.

 

INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

This course will focus primarily on various methods of interpersonal communication. Included in this unit will be an assessment of the individual’s style of communication and suggestions for improvement. One cannot communicate effectively unless he knows as much as he can about himself. Consequently, one of the course objectives will be to aid the student in acquiring greater self-knowledge. Role-playing sessions and communication exercises will be utilized so that the student will be better prepared to deal with all forms of interpersonal communication. FINE ARTS SURVEYThis course will provide an introduction to a variety of fine arts including music, art, drama, and dance. Students will be exposed to the major works in each category, as well as the history of the art form. Completion of the course meets the arts component of the TOPS program.

 

 

 

 

Foreign Language Deapartment

Department Head: Mrs. Stacy Freeman

 

 

COURSE OFFERINGS

 

FRENCH I

This course is geared toward the beginning student who wishes to learn French.  The material is organized around the four goals of foreign language study;   speaking, listening, writing and reading which provide the student with the vocabulary and grammar necessary for basic communication skills.  The course emphasizes the mastery of these skills through guided thematic chapters and through communication in real-life situations.  Activities require structured responses as well as encourage free communication.  Selected readings from the text and from the local community are examined in order to show connections to other disciplines.  Students are exposed to the diversity of the Francophone world including literature, culture and geography so they may understand the differences between American and French lifestyles. 

 

 

 

FRENCH II

The second year of French is a continuation of the goals of French I.  The student continues the study of French life and culture as well as communication in the target language.  Special attention is given to more complex grammatical structures and to increasing vocabulary and improving writing skills.  Emphasis is placed on building confidence in speaking and in making comparisons between the native and target languages.  Students work towards an understanding of the government, economics and cultural exchanges of the French speaking world.  Classes will work with French prayers and be exposed to the folklore and customs from the French culture in which they live.  Material is presented in French as much so that the use of the language skills studied can become a daily occurrence.

Prerequisite: Completion of French I

 

 

 

FRENCH III

This course continues the study of French grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and culture begun in French I and II.  However, greater emphasis is placed on reading select materials from the Francophone world and on writing using all of the vocabulary and grammar presented.  All subject matter is presented and discussed in the target language.  Students successfully completing French III are encouraged to take placement exams to receive credit for entry level courses at the University level. 

 

 

 

FRENCH III (DUAL ENROLLMENT)

This course continues the study of French grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and culture begun in French I and II. However, greater emphasis is placed on reading select materials from the Francophone world and on writing using all of the vocabulary and grammar presented. All subject matter is presented and discussed in the target language. Upon completion of the course with a grade of “C” or better, students earn six hours of college credit through Louisiana Tech University. Cost is set annually by the university and fees are due at the beginning of the semester.
Prerequisites: Junior standing, completion of French II with a grade of B or better, a 20 composite score on the ACT or PLAN test, and/or recommendation of the instructor.

 

 

 

SPANISH I

This course is designed for the beginning student who wishes to learn Spanish.  Study is organized around the four goals of foreign language learning:  speaking, listening, writing and reading.  These fundamentals provide the student with the vocabulary necessary for basic communication skills.  Emphasis is placed on incorporating the language into everyday conversation.  Skills are developed through oral and written practice along with the study of thematic lessons.  In addition to text work, students are exposed to the Spanish culture and language through the study of and participation in cultural activities.

 

 

 

SPANISH II

The second year of Spanish is a continuation of the foundation established in Spanish I.  The student continues the study of Spanish vocabulary and grammar, broadening their understanding of the language and culture.  Emphasis is placed on more complex grammatical structures as well as improving speaking and writing skills.  Material is presented in Spanish as much as possible so that the use of the language skills studied can become a daily occurrence.

Prerequisite: Completion of Spanish I

 

 

 

 

 

Mathematics Department

Department Head: Mrs. Amie Adams

 

Department Overview

The Teurlings Catholic Math Department seeks to fulfill two main goals: preparing students for college mathematics courses and helping students score well on the ACT exam.

 

The Mathematics section of the ACT contains sixty multiple-choice questions:

*Twenty-four questions dealing with pre-algebra and elementary algebra

*Eighteen questions dealing with intermediate algebra and coordinate geometry

*Fourteen questions dealing with geometry 

*Four questions dealing with trigonometry

 

As a result, students at Teurlings are encouraged to take four years of mathematics courses and are required to complete Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry. Upper-level courses in Advanced Mathematics and Calculus are offered along with Math II, a course designed for college-bound students who have completed math graduation requirements but who need remediation work in Algebra and Geometry. In this area, students concentrate on making mathematical connections and using principles of mathematics to communicate, reason, and solve problems. Students complete projects requiring them to apply number systems, operations, and forms in real-world contexts.

 

 

 

 

MATH TRACKS CHART

 

TRACKS:

9TH:

10TH:

11TH:

12TH:

9th Grader who took Algebra I as an 8th Grader

Geometry

Algebra II

Advanced

Math I/Precalculus

Calculus or

Adv. Math II/Functions & Statistics**

9th Grade Algebra I Accelerated

Algebra I

Geometry and Algebra II*

Advanced

Math I/Precalculus

Calculus or

Adv. Math II/Functions & Statistics**

 

9th Grade Algebra I

Algebra I

Geometry

Algebra II

Advanced

Math I/Precalculus or

Financial Math***

 

*Note: 10th grade students who wish to accelerate their progress in math may schedule Geometry and Algebra II concurrently.

 

** Note: Placement into the senior math course is dependent on the course taken in the junior year, the level of the course (regular or honors), the student’s grade in the junior course, and the student’s ACT or PLAN test scores.

 

***Note: Financial Math fulfills basic graduation requirements for the fourth math course, but does not meet TOPS, Core 4, or Board of Regents Admission Standards.

 

 

 
SENIOR MATH TRACKS

11th Grade Math Course

12th Grade Recommended Math Course

Algebra II, Grade of A, B, C

Advanced Math I/Precalculus

Algebra II Honors, Grade of A or B

Advanced Math I/Precalculus Honors

Algebra II Honors, Grade of C or D

Advanced Math I/Precalculus

Algebra II, Grade D or ACT/PLAN score less than 18

Financial Math (does not meet TOPS , Core 4, or

BESE Board entrance requirements)

Advanced Math I/Precalculus, Grade A, B, C

Advanced Math II/Functions and Statistics

Advanced Math I/Precalculus Honors

Calculus Honors

Advanced Math I/Precalculus Honors, Grade C or D

Advanced Math II/Functions and Statistics

 

 

COURSE OFFERINGS

 

ALGEBRA I

The course is designed for students who have completed pre-algebra.  Topics covered include expressions, equations, functions and their graphs, solving linear equations and inequalities, using proportional reasoning, analyzing linear equations, exploring polynomials, factoring, and solving quadratic equations.  The TI-83 graphing calculator is used in the second half of the course.

 

 

 

ALGEBRA I (HONORS)

This course is designed for students who were high achievers in pre-algebra.  Topics covered are the same as the topics covered in Algebra I at a more accelerated pace.  In addition to those topics, others covered are exploring quadratic and exponential functions, rational expressions and equations, and radical expressions and equations.  Real-life applications of each topic are stressed in the course.  The graphing calculator is used in the second half of the course.

Applicants must meet honors program standards.

 

 

 

GEOMETRY

This course is for students who have successfully completed Algebra I.  It includes the study of lines, angles, perpendicular lines,  and planes,  polygons,  congruency and similarity of polygons, special quadrilaterals, circles,  areas of polygons and volumes of solids.  Constructions using a straightedge and a compass are also studied.  Computer software is used whenever appropriate. 

 

 

 

GEOMETRY (HONORS)

This course is for students who have excelled in Algebra I or Algebra I (Honors).  The course includes all of the topics covered in regular geometry.   In addition, proofs, coordinate geometry, right triangle trigonometry, and tesselations are studied.  Computer software is used whenever appropriate.

Applicants must meet honors program standards.

 

 

 

ALGEBRA II

This course is designed for students who have satisfactorily completed the requirements for Algebra I and Geometry and who plan to attend college upon graduation.  This course satisfies college requirements for a 3rd year of college-prep math.  Topics covered include sets, the field of real numbers, linear equations and inequalities in one variable, solving simultaneous two and three variable equations, functions and their graphs in the Cartesian coordinate system, quadratic equations and factoring, exponents, radicals, irrational and complex number systems, and polynomials.

 

 

 

ALGEBRA II (HONORS)

This course is opened to students who have satisfactorily completed the requirements for Algebra I or Honors or Geometry or Honors.  This course is designed for mathematically capable students.  This course is a study of equations and inequalities, graphs and functions, polynomials and factoring, rational expressions, irrational and complex numbers, quadratic equations and functions, systems of two and three equations, exponential and logarithmic functions.  Emphasis is on solving word problems as applications of the above.  The graphing calculator is used extensively throughout the course.

Applicants must meet honors program standards.

 

 

 

ADVANCED MATH I/PRECALCULUS
This course is for students who have completed Algebra II. The course prepares the student for college trigonometry and college algebra. The first semester is a study of linear equations and systems, matrices, polynomial and rational functions, inequalities, and logarithmic and exponential functions. The second semester is a study of trigonometric ratios, acute angles and right triangles, circular functions and graphs, solving triangles, identities and equations, inverse trigonometric functions, and polar graphs. The graphing calculator and computer software are used extensively throughout the course.

 

 

 

ADVANCED MATH I/PRECALCULUS (HONORS)
This course is for students who have excelled in Algebra II or Algebra II Honors. The emphasis is on preparing students for college calculus. The first semester covers the same topics as Advanced Math I/Precalculus. In addition, the factor theory and synthetic substitution are studied. The second semester covers the same topics as in Trigonometry but in more depth. The graphing calculator and computer software are used extensively throughout the course.

 

 

 

ADVANCED MATH II (DUAL ENROLLMENT)
This course is under development for the 2013-2014 school year.

 

 

 

FINANCIAL MATHEMATICS

In Financial Mathematics, students study the following topics: gross income, net income, checking accounts, savings accounts, cash purchases, charge accounts, credit cards, loans, personal and family finances, insurance and investments, and topics pertaining to the business world (marketing, personnel, payrolls, etc.). In addition to basic math facts, students will review the calculation of interest, percents and fractions. Students will be required to complete several projects. This course may not be used to fulfill TOPS requirements nor will it satisfy Core 4 or BESE Board Entrance Requirements.

 

 

 

ADVANCED MATH II/FUNCTIONS & STATISTICS
In this course, students continue the study of Advanced Math begun in Advanced Math I/Precalculus, with an emphasis on polynomial functions, trigonometric functions and equations, sequences, series, limits and rational functions and are introduced to the basics of statistics.

 

 

 

CALCULUS (HONORS)

This course is for students who have successfully completed Advanced Math Honors.  Following a review of pre-calculus, topics covered include functions, models, limits and derivatives, differentiation and applications, integrals and applications, and differential equations.  The graphing calculator & computer software are used throughout the course.

 

 

 

CALCULUS (DUAL ENROLLMENT)
This course is under development for the 2013-2014 school year.

 

 

 

 

Physical Education Department

Department Head: Mr. Joe Heintz

 

Department Goals

Physical education courses are designed to increase the student’s awareness of the importance of physical activity in creating a healthy lifestyle. Students are encouraged through physical activity to increase their fitness level. Emphasis is placed not only on participation in team sports and exercise, but in increasing awareness and participation in lifetime sports and skills that will be available to them as adults. Students are required to complete a one-semester course in PE during their freshman year, as well as a one-semester course in Health, and a full-year PE course in the sophomore year. In addition to the two required courses, electives are offered in the 11th and 12th grade allowing students to schedule PE III-IV or Athletic PE.

 

COURSE OFFERINGS

 

HEALTH & P.E. I

During the first year of high school Physical Education, opportunities are provided for students to become involved in both individual and team based sports. The activities for the freshmen students may include: physical fitness, flag football, volleyball,, track and field, and pickelball. The program shall be directed toward individual competency in skill, knowledge and attitude in these particular areas. Also, Health Education provides adolescents with the knowledge, skills, and understanding necessary to function in ways that enhance their immediate and long-term health. Health education promotes the completion of the developmental tasks necessary to move from adolescence to adulthood in ways that enhance health. The students will develop and gain a health background that can be used throughout their entire lives. A PE uniform is required.

 

ATHLETIC PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH I

Athletic Physical Education and Health I course for those students participating in football, volleyball, basketball, softball, and baseball at Teurlings Catholic and combines the required half year study of Health with opportunities to develop and maintain a high level of fitness and conditioning. Students will participate in a program of weight-lifting, running, and selected drills designed to develop or enhance agility, speed, and quickness as well as overall conditioning while completing all classroom portions of the required state Health curriculum.Prerequisites: Student must be an active member of the football, basketball, volleyball, softball, or baseball teams.P.E. II Physical Education II is designed to offer a variety of team and individual activities, as well as to provide an introduction to lifetime sports. This approach will hopefully enable the students to participate in some activity which he/she is likely to pursue as an adult, or enjoy as a leisure sport. Physical fitness is again included at this level. The activities and sports offered in this course are physical fitness, field hockey, tininkling, badminton, archery, and pickelball. Students must purchase a TCH physical education uniform. *Prerequisite: P.E. I/Health

 

ATHLETIC PHYSICAL EDUCATION II/III/IV

Athletic Physical Education is an advanced physical education course for those students participating in football, volleyball, basketball, softball, or baseball at Teurlings Catholic and is designed to provide students with opportunities to develop and maintain a high level of fitness and conditioning. Students will participate in a year-long program of weight-lifting, running, and selected drills designed to develop or enhance agility, speed, and quickness as well as overall conditioning.Prerequisites: Completion of Health and Physical Education I and student must be an active member of the football, basketball, volleyball, softball, or baseball teams.

 

PE III/IV

This Physical Education class is designed for those students who are not participating in organized sports at TCH but who are interested in developing and maintaining an accelerated level of fitness. Strength-training, speed development, agility, and conditioning are emphasized as well as the study of lifetime sports. *Prerequisite: P.E. I & II

 

PE III/IV (DUAL ENROLLMENT)

 

INTRODUCTION TO SPORTS MEDICINE

The course is designed to introduce the student to the basics of care and prevention of athletic injuries. In addition to classroom study of causes and treatments for athletic injuries, students will study nutrition, hydration, prevention of heat-related illnesses and other topics. *Prerequisite: P.E. I & II and completion of Biology I

 

 

 

 

 

Science Department

Department Head: Mrs. Dona Dugas

 

Content Standards, as well as standards for the American College Test administered to all students entering Louisiana colleges and universities. In addition standards developed by the education departments in the states of California, Florida, and Texas are incorporated into the TCH curriculum.

 

PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE EDUCATION

 

Science education in Louisiana must prepare students to become informed citizens who have acquired the necessary scientific and technological knowledge and skills to function responsibly in the global community of the 21st century. It is essential that everyone involved in science education provide an opportunity for all students to become scientifically literate and reflective of the inherent nature of scientific knowledge, methods, and processes.  Scientific knowledge should be constructed through a hands-on/minds-on approach with overarching concepts that connect the sciences and other disciplines. Methodology and teaching strategies should be inquiry-based and include hands-on/minds-on activities. Assessment should reflect this inquiry-based curriculum and instruction and be used to improve teaching and learning.  It is the responsibility of the entire community to be involved in science education reform efforts. This widespread involvement should encourage students of this state to become life-long learners.

 

NATURE OF SCIENCE

 

Science is a way of thinking and a system of knowledge that uses reason, observation, experimentation, and imagination. The goal of science is to describe, explain, and predict natural phenomena and processes. Science shares some characteristics with other forms of scholarly inquiry, but it is unique in several important ways. Science attempts to meet the criteria of testability, objectivity, and consistency. Scientific information is continuously open to review and modification; science is not a static body of knowledge. One of the functions of science education is to teach students to understand scientific information and the processes by which it was derived. Science is a complex social activity. Scientific knowledge is generated not only by individuals but also by scientists who work cooperatively in laboratories and in the field. For scientific ideas to become widely accepted, peers must review, analyze, and critique results through journal articles, replication of experiments, and presentations at professional meetings. This process has implications for the way science is taught. It suggests the importance of working in cooperative groups, recording and presenting laboratory and field results, debating issues, and posing new questions based on current findings. Scientists generally work with theories, which are explanations or predictions drawn from analyses of past scientific results. Investigations of the validity of a theory may take many different forms, including observing, collecting specimens and data for analysis, and conducting experiments. Few scientists actually follow the orderly steps of what is known as the "scientific method." Instead, they may omit, move, or augment one or more of these steps. Scientists' explanations about what happens in the world come partly from what they observe and partly from what they infer; sometimes scientists have different explanations for the same set of observations.  Scientists also use their imaginations to consider possible causes or outcomes: A number of scientific discoveries have been based on a scientist’s idea, which was then tested for validity. It is always important for scientists to consider their own biases or preconceptions and to seek to eliminate these from their work.

 

UNIFYING CONCEPTS AND PROCESSES

 

Science, mathematics, and technology are crosscut by big ideas that transcend disciplinary boundaries. They are useful in teaching as a means of organizing science content in ways that are meaningful for students and that promote interdisciplinary instruction. Current approaches to science teaching emphasize the need to convey "big ideas" rather than isolated facts that may not fit into any meaningful pattern for the student. When instruction is organized around large concepts, it is easier for students to find meaning in specific facts and to relate them to the larger concepts presented. Unifying concepts and processes provide students with powerful ideas to help them understand the natural world. These include, but are not limited to, the following:

 

            · systems, order, and organization;

 

            · evidence, models, and explanation;

 

            · change, constancy, and measurement; and

 

            · form and function.

 

INSTRUCTIONAL ISSUES

 

The purpose of science education is not for students to memorize the "right" answer, but for them to move along a learning continuum toward a deeper understanding of science concepts and processes. Current research indicates that it is best for understanding to be constructed actively by the learner. This learning style offers a new role for the science teacher as a facilitator of learning versus an imparter of knowledge. Instruction should minimize rote learning and focus on in-depth understanding of major concepts and topics, with students actively exploring those ideas through activities they can relate to their own lives. Students often work cooperatively in small groups to exchange and critique their own ideas, with the teacher facilitating discussion rather than providing answers. Science is presented as a human enterprise and a continuing process for extending understanding, instead of the ultimate, unalterable truth. Learning activities are often interdisciplinary, stressing the connections between the sciences and other subjects. Science teachers must have a solid understanding of the basic concepts

and processes of science in order to construct meaningful science activities that address all students' diverse experiences and learning styles. During the last decade, a major change has occurred in science educators’ views about how science learning takes place. The science education research community now views effective science teaching as helping the learner build upon prior knowledge to construct a scientific understanding of the phenomena being studied -- making learning a lifelong construction project. Research studies have shown that students begin school not as "blank slates," but with a substantial set of ideas about how the world functions. These ideas usually have developed without any exposure to formal science instruction, but rather through observation, guesswork, and bits of information filtered down from adults and other children. Students often form misconceptions about such basic processes as why the seasons change, how gravity works, and what electricity is. The most important finding from these research studies is not that students have preconceptions about science, but that their misconceptions are deeply rooted and tenacious.

To address this instructional dilemma, teachers need to elicit students' ideas and then allow the students to test their ideas against scientific knowledge and thereby construct their own

understanding. It is important to underscore that the learners must do the constructing, not the teacher. The teacher should choose excellent teaching activities and materials, but it is the learner who must actively connect the new knowledge to what he or she already knows.

 

Activities or processes that facilitate this construction of knowledge are listed below in three broad categories:

 

Using Knowledge

            describing

            explaining

            predicting

            designing

            analyzing

 

Constructing New Knowledge

            asking questions

            solving problems

            interpreting text

            reconstructing knowledge

 

Reflecting on Knowledge

            justifying

            criticizing

            describing limits

            making connections

            taking perspectives

            describing interactions

 

 

These activities will offer students the opportunity to dispel their misconceptions as they continually construct new scientific knowledge.

 

TECHNOLOGY

 

Just as science is both a process and content, so is technology. As a process, technology is the using of scientific knowledge and other resources to develop new products and processes. While the emphasis in science is on gaining knowledge of the natural world, the emphasis in technology is on finding practical ways to apply that knowledge to solve problems. "Science helps drive technology, as it provides knowledge for better understanding, instruments, and techniques. Technology is essential to science because it enables observations of phenomena that are far beyond the capabilities of scientists due to factors such as distance, location, size, and speed and provides tools for investigations, inquiry, and analysis" (NSE Standards, pp. v-95). The emphasis of technology in the classroom should be on knowledge construction to solve problems. The posing and solving of problems that are increasingly complex will enable students to develop skills that are vital to living in a technical world.

 

Students should develop an awareness and appreciation for the continuing progress in technology as it affects the quality of individual lives as well as society, in order to become better

informed citizens and consumers and become computer literate and proficient, as it applies to the computer’s capability to acquire data (with sensors), interpret data (by graphing), and as a research tool (library and Internet).

 

MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT

 

Instructional materials and equipment can increase students’ interest and improve achievement; they deserve a prominent place in science programs. Students should have access to materials and equipment and be offered opportunities to learn to use them effectively. It is essential that classroom teachers have the necessary non-consumable and consumable materials and equipment provided and that they be maintained and/or replenished.

 

CLASSROOM ASSESSMENT

 

Assessment serves many important purposes in the science classroom: diagnostic (to plan instruction to fit the student's prior knowledge), formative (to improve performance and adapt instruction), and summative (to report on final performance). The purpose of the assessment determines the assessment technique.

 

            1.  Assessment should parallel instruction. As science education develops toward a hands-on, inquiry-based approach to learning, assessments will need to become more activity-based.

 

            2.  Assessment should be fair and equitable. Throughout the learning process, expectations should be clearly articulated to students. Assessment activities that measure skills beyond recall of facts should be challenging and thoughtful; however, all students should be given learning opportunities that enable them to apply concepts and skills successfully. In order to determine what students know and are able to do as a result of science instruction, teachers must develop assessments that are free of gender, racial, and language barriers.

 

            3.  Assessment should include data from multiple sources. Varied assessment strategies provide opportunities for teachers to observe students as they conduct a variety of tasks in different settings. Student-generated products from group work, entries from individual science journals, student-designed investigations and exhibitions, and student-constructed written responses are rich sources of data that enable teachers to determine students’ understanding of science concepts and processes.

 

Assessment should encourage the development of higher order thinking skills; therefore, assessment must be designed to require students not just to recall random facts, but to demonstrate scientific problem-solving and conceptual knowledge. New designs for assessment must encourage forms of active assessment that are imbedded in instruction.

 

 

 

COURSE OFFERINGS

 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE

Physical Science is designed to introduce the student to the sciences which deal with physical relationships in nature. Because mathematics is the foundation of the physical sciences, a solid mathematics background is expected. The student will be introduced to technical vocabulary representing scientific concepts.  The topics addressed in this course include: measurements in science, force and motion, laws of motion, work and simple machines, properties of matter, elements and the Periodic Table, compounds and bonding, metal and nonmetal families, the carbon family, and chemical reactions.

 

 

 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE (HONORS)

Honors Physical Science is designed to introduce in-depth studies of concepts in the physical sciences.  Selected topics will include those from the areas of chemistry and physics.  Students enrolled in this course are expected to know basic math skills and have an understanding of the metric system. Topics covered will include the study of matter, its structure and changes, the Periodic Table, chemical formulas, equations, organic chemistry, motion, energy, and waves.  Basic chemical and physical laboratory procedures and techniques will be introduced.  Special projects including research, outside readings, and experimental procedures will be required.

Applicants must meet honors program standards.

 

 

 

BIOLOGY I

The study of Biology I addresses the scientific process of life, both plant and animal, through classroom lectures, demonstrations, and laboratory experiments.  The course is designed with emphasis on developing an understanding of the relationships within the student’s environment.  Included concepts are:  cell theory, biochemistry, molecular biology, classification and diversity, microbiology, plants, invertebrate and vertebrate biology, human biology, and ecology.  Through these topics, the students will gain a better understanding of their total environment, and the interactions that occur within it.

Prerequisite: Physical Science

 

 

 

BIOLOGY I (HONORS)

Honors Biology I is an in-depth study of the complex interactions between organisms and their environment.  Classroom lecture, demonstrations, and laboratory experiences will be used.  Emphasis is placed on developing the student’s investigative skills and critical reasoning ability.  Topics of study will include:  cellular structure and function, molecular biology, biochemistry, heredity and genetics, DNA technology, microbiology, plant life, invertebrate, and vertebrate study, and ecological relationships.  Through detailed studies of these topics, the student will develop an appreciation for the environment and the complex interdependencies that occur.  Assignments include scientific investigations and outside readings.

Applicants must meet honors program standards.

 

 

 

CHEMISTRY

Chemistry is designed to introduce the student to general chemical principles in order to obtain basic knowledge in the field of chemistry.  This is done using textbooks, visual demonstration and hands-on experiences.  Students will also be introduced to basic chemistry lab procedures including knowledge of lab equipment and lab terminology.  The topics that will be covered in this course include: scientific measurements, matter and its changes, atomic structure and electron configurations, the Periodic Law and an in-depth study of the periodic table of elements, chemical formulas and equations, mass relations including the mole concept, and the behavior of gases.  Math skills are important in order to be successful in this course.

Prerequisite: Biology I      

 

 

 

CHEMISTRY (HONORS)

Honors Chemistry is designed to introduce the student to chemistry principles used to obtain knowledge in the complex field of chemistry.  This is done using textbooks, individual and group research, visual demonstrations and hands-on experiences.  Students will also be introduced to chemistry lab procedures including knowledge and proper use of lab equipment, terminology, and techniques.  Topics covered in the course include: scientific measurements and calculations using significant figures, the states of matter and its changes, atomic structure and electron configurations, the Periodic Law and an in-depth study of the periodic table of elements, chemical formulas and equations, mass relations including the mole concept, stoichiometry, the behavior of gases, acids and bases, solutions and organic chemistry; therefore, proficient math skills are important in order to be successful in this course.

Applicants must meet honors program standards.    

 

 

 

CHEMISTRY II (HONORS)

This course is designed to prepare students for college-level general and organic chemistry courses.  Students will attain a depth of understanding of fundamentals and a reasonable competence in dealing with chemical problems.   Emphasis will be placed on organic chemistry principles. Chemistry lab procedures and principles will be a vital part of the course.

Applicants must meet honors program standards. Prerequisite:  Chemistry and Algebra II with a grade of B or better in both and teacher recommendation.

         

  

                                                              

BIOLOGY II

Biology II is designed to prepare senior high school students for college level biological science courses.  Topics  studied  include basic biological-chemistry principles, molecular biology, molecular and Mendelian genetics, heredity, DNA technology, and mechanisms of evolution.  The Biology II course is structured to enhance materials covered in previous science courses.  It aims to provide students with conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal with the rapidly changing science of biology.  Biology II is designed for the college bound student.

Prerequisites: grade of C or better in Biology I and Chemistry.

 

 

 

 BIOLOGY II (HONORS)

Honors Biology II is designed to adequately prepare senior high school students for college level biological science courses.  As an advanced course of study, Biology II will require individual investigation and critical thinking skills.  Topics studied include basic biological-chemistry principles, molecular biology, molecular and Mendelian genetics, heredity, DNA technology, and  mechanisms of evolution.  The Biology II Honors course is structured to enhance materials covered in previous science courses.  It aims to provide students with conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal with the rapidly changing science of biology.  Special projects including research, outside readings, and experimental investigations will be required.

Applicants must meet honors program standards. Prerequisites: grade of B or better in Biology I and Chemistry and/or recommendation of the teacher.

 

 

 

HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

Human Anatomy and Physiology is designed to prepare students for college-level anatomy courses. Human body systems are studied in detail with regards to structure and function. Topics studied will also include basic biological-chemistry principles, and molecular biology.

 

 

 

PHYSICS

Physics is designed to introduce the theories relevant to measurement, the dynamics of linear and circular motion, momentum and its conservation, universal gravitation, work and power, energy, thermodynamics, light and sound waves, electricity and magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction and electromagnetic field operations. A mathematical model of the physical world is stressed. In addition, laboratory activities, demonstrations, and hands-on activities are provided. The course requires math proficiency and should be scheduled concurrently with Advanced Math I.
Prerequisites: C or better in Algebra II and Chemistry. Course must be scheduled concurrently with Advanced Math I, Advanced Math II, or Calculus.

 

 

 

PHYSICS (HONORS)

Honors Physics moves at a quicker pace than Physics and introduces the theories relevant to measurement, the dynamics of linear and circular motion, momentum and its conservation, universal gravitation, work and power, energy, thermodynamics, light and sound waves, electricity and magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction and electromagnetic field operations. A mathematical model of the physical world is stressed. In addition, laboratory activities, demonstrations, and hands-on activities are provided. The course requires math proficiency and should be scheduled concurrently with Advanced Math II or Calculus.
Prerequisite: B or better in Honors Algebra II or Honors Chemistry. Course must be scheduled concurrently with Advanced Math II or Calculus. 

 

 

 

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

An on-line course, Environmental Science provides an appreciation and understanding of concepts in environmental science, and offers opportunities to develop particular interests in wildlife conservation, environmental impact assessment, pollution and waste management. Most of the concepts are related to managing human impact on the environment and preserving the environment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Social Studies Department

Department Head: Mrs. Cathryn Martin

 

Department Goals

In Social Studies, the goal is for all students to develop a deep, rich network of understandings related to the world around them. The objectives and competencies included in this curriculum deal with history, geography, economics, and civics from a diverse, global perspective. Students engage in projects that require them to apply Social Studies skills in real-world contexts.

 

 

COURSE OFFERINGS

 

WORLD GEOGRAPHY

World Geography is a basic course required for graduation, incorporating the features of physical, cultural, and political geography.  The course is designed to prepare students for the study of American History, Civics, and World History at Teurlings and at the college level, with emphasis on how we, as Americans, fit into world society.  The course stresses coverage of current events, as well as traditional geographic themes.  Students will study the physical features that shape the earth and its land masses, as well as the ways the weather, climate, and man affect the earth's physical structures.  In additional, students will learn about the cultural regions of the earth.  This part of the course focuses on the people: their history, languages, customs, religions, foods and industries.  The final aspect of the course is political geography, where the political systems of individual countries and regions are studied. 

 

 

 

WORLD GEOGRAPHY (HONORS)

Honors World Geography is a faster paced version of World Geography, incorporating the features of physical and political geography with an emphasis on cultural, historical, and social geography. The course is designed to prepare students for advanced study through the DE program in World and US History. Additional readings, more projects, and independent study are required in the course.


 

 

CIVICS

Citizenship education is the ultimate goal of any Civics class.  The Constitution, federal system of government, and state and local governments are covered in this course.  The infusion of one's duties and responsibilities as a member of our society is taught in conjunction with the economic role of the individual and family.  These concepts are enhanced by observing the process in action, through a comprehensive look at current events, as well as speakers from the community who can give personal insight into the government process.

Prerequisite: World Geography

 

 

 

CIVICS (HONORS)

The pace is quicker and the course relies more heavily on independent work than the regular Civics class in stressing citizenship education. The Constitution, federal system of government, and state and local government structure are studied in depth.

Applicants must meet honors program standards.

 

 

 

U.S. HISTORY

This course is designed to study the origins of our nation’s democracy and its development and expansion to include all citizens over the last 200 plus years with special significance placed on events from  the Civil War to the present.  It will touch upon the economic as well as social changes experienced by the nation.  Foreign policy and the rise of the United States to its role in world leadership in today’s global economy is also examined. Students will be expected to make comparisons between past and current events.  Students will be expected to complete an average of 20-30 minutes of homework each class day.  Tests will be a combination of both objective and essay questions.  A research paper is assigned during the second semester.  Students may be required to read a historical novel and collaborate on several group projects

Prerequisite: Civics

 

 

 

U.S. HISTORY (HONORS)

 

 

 

U.S. HISTORY (DUAL ENROLLMENT)

The purpose of this course is to study the history of America at a faster pace and in greater detail than regular American History.  Students will be asked to meet the same objectives as regular American History but will also be required to read and analyze historical documents.  Tests will consist of objective as well as several essay questions.  Students will also be required to apply material learned in class and create new conclusions.  Students will be expected to complete an average of 30 to 40 minutes of homework each class day.  A research paper is assigned during the second semester as well as essays throughout the year.  Students are required to read two historical novels and collaborate on several group projects.

AApplicants must meet honors program standards. Students are required to take the AP Exam in May, the results of which may result in college credit in history. Note: A $110.00 fee  is charged for this course. A contract must be signed by the parent and student for participation in the course.          

 

 

 

WORLD HISTORY

This course stresses the development of western civilization, from its prehistoric roots to conflicts in the modern 20th Century. Emphasis is placed on historical cause and effect and the people responsible for the events that shaped mankind, rather than the memorization of dates focusing on events from the Renaissance to the present.  A research paper is required, as well as participation in at least one major project per quarter.  Selected and approved historical novel(s) will also be read as part of the course work.   

Prerequisite: American History

 

 

 

WORLD HISTORY (DUAL ENROLLMENT)

This course is a study of the basic chronology and major events and trends from approximately 1450 to the present.  The goals of the Advanced Placement program in world history are to develop (a) an understanding of some of the principal themes in modern European history and (b) an ability to analyze historical evidence.  The student is required to read and evaluate various primary and secondary source materials from different cultures and ages.  Special emphasis is placed on the relationships of different cultures in man’s drive toward civilization. 

Applicants must meet honors program standards. Students are required to take the AP Exam in May, which may result in college credit in history.  Note: A $110.00 fee is charged for this course. A contract must be signed by the parent and student for participation in the course.               

 

 

 

PSYCHOLOGY

This is an introductory Psychology course which provides a foundation in the basic theories and principles of psychology to guide students toward a greater understanding of their own capacity for growth. Traditional topics include: personality, learning, and social psychology.  Also included are the areas of:  child and adolescent development; the brain and dreams; the troubled personality; and parapsychology.  Various schools of psychology are introduced, also providing benefits from the findings in a field that touches virtually every aspect of our daily lives.

 

 

 

SOCIOLOGY

This is an introductory course which provides a foundation in the basic theories and principles of sociology and man’s place within society to guide students toward a greater understanding of their capacity for growth within society. Various disciplines in sociology will also be introduced.

 

 

 

UNITED STATES IN THE 21st CENTURY

The course is designed to study the history of Modern America with emphasis on interpretation and analysis of the materials by contemporary historians.  It is assumed that the students will acquire a basic understanding of the factual material before embarking on discussion or venturing opinions.  The topics, which include both the study of history and current events, are an attempt to gain perspective on the present political and social developments in recent American history.  The course will consider in relative depth the following topics:   John F. Kennedy and the New Frontier, Johnson’s Great Society and Vietnam, Nixon’s Foreign Policy and Watergate, Reagan and the resurgence of conservatism, George H.W. Bush and the Persian Gulf Crisis, William Clinton’s “new” democrat, moderate reform, economic boom and impeachment, and George W. Bush’s compassionate conservatism and the War on Terror.

(This course may not be used to fulfill the TOPS social studies requirements.) A contract must be signed by the parent and student for participation in the course.

 

 

 

 

 

Theology Department

Department Head: Mrs. Josette Surratt

Campus Minister: Mrs. Ramey Badeaux

 

Mission Statement:


The Teurlings Catholic High School Theology program is committed to cultivating the faith life of all TCH students. Through opportunities rooted in prayer, instruction, worship, and service, this program strives to create an environment permeated by faith. The theology curriculum is comprised of six, one semester courses in accordance with the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops doctrinal framework. By integrating the gospel values and teaching of our faith, Teurlings Catholic instills in its young men and women the desire to live as Catholic Christians, the drive for life-long learning and the skills to succeed as responsible citizens in society. Focusing upon the particular gifts of each student and grounded in Catholic tradition, this program empowers individuals to reach out to their classmates, their church parishes and the members of their community.

 

 

COURSE OFFERINGS

 


RELIGIOUS STUDIES I - Course I, The Revelation of Jesus Christ in Scripture (Fall) and Course II, Who is Jesus Christ (Spring)


In Course I, “Revelation of Jesus Christ in Scripture,” students are introduced to Sacred Scriptures. Through the study of the Old Testament and New Testament, students encounter Christ on a more personal level. In Course II, “Who is Jesus Christ,” students study the mystery of Christ, as the second person of the Trinity, as he taught, healed, and ministered throughout Galilee.

 

 

RELIGIOUS STUDIES II—Course III, The Mission of Jesus Christ (Fall) and Course IV, Jesus Christ Continues the Mission of the Church (Spring)


In Course III, “The Mission of Jesus Christ,” students explore the meaning of God’s sacred and mysterious plan from creation, to the consequences and promises of Original Sin, through his compassionate and loving care, culminating in the Life, Passion, Death, and Resurrection of Jesus Christ. In Course IV, “Jesus Christ Continues the Mission of the Church,” students study the basics of Catholic history from the founding of the church by the apostles to the living Body of Christ today, as well as definitions of “church” and the importance of the Catholic Church throughout modern history.

 

 

RELIGIOUS STUDEIS III—Course V, Sacraments as Privileged Encounters with Jesus Christ (Fall) and Course VI, Sacred Scripture/The Old Testament (Spring)


In Course V, “Sacraments as Privileged Encounters with Jesus Christ,” students are presented with a Christocentric view of the liturgy and sacraments. The roots of the sacraments studied as they apply not only to the church today but to the life, words, and actions of Jesus Christ. In Course VI, “The Old Testament,” the roots of our Catholic Church is uncovered through the study of the Old Testament. Judaic practices incorporated in today’s church are emphasized.

 

 

RELIGIOUS STUDIES IV—Course VII, Catholic Church History (Fall) and Course VIII, Life in Jesus Christ (Spring)


In Course VII, “Catholic Church History,” students continue the study of the Catholic Church as begun in Course IV, but in more depth. Topics such as the early church, schisms, reformation and reform, and Vatican II are discussed in depth. In Course VIII, “Life in Jesus Christ,” students explore Catholic morality, especially in future roles in marriage and in service to the church as religious and laity.

 


CAMPUS MINISTRY

 

This elective course provides students with the skills, tools, and opportunities to minister to the spiritual needs of other students, faculty, and the community. Campus ministers also form the nucleus of the Teurlings Catholic Retreat Team, planning, organizing, and facilitating retreats for the TCHS students as well as students at other Catholic schools. Other ministry programs, including weekly liturgical celebrations, daily prayer, Rebel Revivals, the Pro-Life March, and school service projects are coordinated by the Campus Ministry Class. Participation in activities outside the normal school day must be required.